The Atlantic Jewish Council

The AJC’s 16th Annual Holocaust Education Week

Saint John: October 6, 2019
Halifax: October 30 – November 7, 2019


“Were the House Still Standing” Film Presentation and Talk by Robert Katz
Oct. 6th | 2PM | Saint John Jewish Historical Museum

Katz, a professor of Art at the University of Maine, Augusta, is the co-creator of WTHSS, an exhibit commissioned as a permanent installation for the Holocaust and Human Rights Center as an innovative audio-visual project to remember the testimony of 16 Maine Holocaust survivors and liberators.

Presented with the support of the Saint John Jewish Historical Museum.


EDUCATOR’S SEMINAR: How to Teach about the Holocaust
Monday, October 25 | Nova Scotia Provincial Social Studies Conference | Saint Mary’s University


PUBLIC OPENING EVENT: “The Day I Met Hitler” Film Screening W/ introduction and narration by the Filmmaker 
Oct. 30th | 7PM | Halifax Central Library, Paul O’Regan Hall

Film screening with introduction and narration by the filmmaker Ronen Israelski.

“The Day I Met Hitler” features newly discovered stories and images of the most infamous man in history. Racing against time the filmmaker weaves together the personal narratives of the last remaining people who had direct contact with Hitler. The film and lecture are presented by a son of a Jewish boy who met Hitler in Berlin in 1934.

Ronen Israelski, Toronto, is a documentary filmmaker. Ronen has been involved in the media industry for over 20 years working in Israel and Canada. This film is his personal biography as a son of a Holocaust survivor.

Presented with the support of the Halifax Central Library


Holocaust Survivor Testimony from Pinchas Gutter
Sunday, November 3 | 2PM | Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, Rowe Hall | 1055 Marginal Road, Halifax

As ten-year-old Pinchas is deported from the Warsaw ghetto to the killing site of Majdanek and then to concentration camps, he shuts himself off to the terrors surrounding him and tries his best not to be noticed, to become almost invisible. But after liberation, his photographic memory won’t let his past fade away, and Pinchas struggles to deal with nightmares and flashbacks while trying to raise a family and heal his emotional scars.

Born in Lodz, Poland, on July 21, 1932, Pinchas Gutter was the only member of his immediate family to survive the Holocaust. Pinchas lived in France, Israel, Brazil and South Africa before immigrating to Canada (Toronto) in 1985.

Presented in partnership with the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21.


STUDENT PROGRAM: Holocaust Survivor Testimony from Pinchas Gutter
Monday, November 4 | Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, Rowe Hall | 1055 Marginal Road, Halifax

**Pre-registration and student preparation required.
Contant Edna LeVine, the AJC’s Director of Community Engagement for more information at
engagement@theajc.ca **


STUDENT PROGRAM: Holocaust Survivor Testimony from Pinchas Gutter
Tuesday November 5th | Islands Consolidated School, Digby County

**Pre-registration and student preparation required.
Contant Edna LeVine, the AJC’s Director of Community Engagement for more information at
engagement@theajc.ca **


STUDENT PROGRAM: Holocaust Survivor Testimony from Sol Nayman Thursday November 7th | Morning | Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

**Pre-registration and student preparation required.
Contant Edna LeVine, the AJC’s Director of Community Engagement for more information at
engagement@theajc.ca **


PUBLIC CLOSING EVENT: Holocaust Survivor Testimony from Sol Nayman
Thursday, November 7 | 7PM | Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, Bronfman Theatre| 1055 Marginal Road, Halifax

Sol Nayman was born in Stoczek Wegrowski, Poland on November 5, 1935. In September 1939, when the Nazis attacked the town, Sol and his family fled to the nearby forest. They later ended up in Bialystok which was under Soviet control. They were then deported to a forced labour camp in Syktyvkar, deep in the Soviet Union. In 1944 they were shipped to a different labour camp in the Ukraine. 

In 1948, Sol and his family were admitted to Canada, together with other Holocaust Survivors as part of the “Tailor Project” and settled in Montreal.  Sol and his family moved to Toronto in 1969.

Presented in partnership with The Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21.


The 16th annual Holocaust Education Week programs are made possible in part by a generous grant from The Azrieli Foundation.